SOLAR ECLIPSE  8/21/17 early afternoon

https://eclipse.aas.org/eclipse-america

Safety Tips

Are Eclipse Glasses or Handheld Solar Viewers
actually legit and safe to use?
https://eclipse.aas.org/eye-safety/iso-certification


Advice is to test all purchased eclipse viewing glasses [as there are counterfeit ones with the valid ISO #] prior to the eclipse by heading outside tonight
 as the sky starts to get dark (similar to what will happen tomorrow 8/21).
Look up at an outside bright light / street lamp.

You should NOT be able to see it at all.

Regular cameras need a special filter  - and staring at the sun via a camera lens can also damage your eye's retina. It is never safe to look directly at the sun through a telescope, binoculars, or camera lens without a solar filter.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/anthonykarcz/2017/08/18/dont-let-the-eclipse-be-the-last-thing-your-iphone-sees/#1f27844d3c92


Northern NJ will not experience a view of the totality of the eclipse,
when the brightness of the sun is totally obscured by the moon!
https://eclipse.aas.org/eye-safety/safe-viewing
https://eclipse.aas.org/eye-safety/optics-filters

A homemade pinhole projector is the safest way of watching the eclipse;
you can make one yourself with 2 thin pieces of stiff paper or cardboard,
or paper plates.

Here’s how:
Put one piece of paper or cardboard (or a paper plate) on the ground.
Poke a tiny, round hole into the other piece of stiff paper or cardboard.
With your back to the sun, raise the cardboard with the hole in it above your head and aim the light coming through the hole at the paper or
cardboard on the ground.
The hole will project an image of the eclipse on to the other paper.

https://eclipse2017.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/publications/2017EclipseAcrossAmericaFlyer_508.pdf


From among all the contestants for this year's  Queen of the Fair,


Miss Montague 

won the People's Choice Award!!

Courtesy:  NJ Herald 7/30/2017 Fair issue


This award is given to the contestant who was chosen through 
ballots sent in by mail to the NJ Herald.

FRAUD ADVISORY: 

Inspector General Warns Public About SSA Employee Impersonation Scheme

Social Security Administration FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

The Acting Inspector General of Social Security, Gale Stallworth Stone, is warning citizens about a new Social Security Administration (SSA) employee impersonation scheme. SSA and its Office of the Inspector General (OIG) are receiving reports from citizens across the country about phone calls from an individual posing as an SSA employee. The caller attempts to acquire personally identifiable information from victims to then edit the victims' direct deposit, address, and telephone information with SSA.

Acting Inspector General Stone warns citizens to be cautious, and to avoid providing information such as your SSN or bank account numbers to unknown persons over the phone or internet unless you are certain of who is receiving it. "You must be very confident that the source is the correct business party, and your information will be secure after you release it," Stone said.

If a person has questions about any communication - email, letter, text or phone call - that claims to be from SSA or the OIG, please contact your local Social Security office, or call Social Security's toll-free customer service number at 1-800-772-1213, 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.Monday through Friday, to verify its legitimacy. 
(Those who are deaf or hard-of-hearing  call Social Security's TTY number at 1-800-325-0778.)
Fourth of July weekend - time to sit back, 
relax and reminisce!

Courtesy http://www.halloweendayquotes.net

If you're curious about life before smartphones, DVD's and HDTV's ... 
enjoy this collection of photos showing how things have changed in NJ.
             
Click this link & #52 on the first image seen.
Montague Township's Historical Society, MARCH,
 starts its summer season today - June 25th

Open House Museum Tours will be offered 1- 4PM
 at the Foster-Armstrong House [FAH] and the Nelden-Roberts Stonehouse.  

Courtesy of MARCH Facebook site

6/25 featured featured exhibit: 
 Covered Bridges with Bill Coughlin, who created each scale model on display.
One side  of each model reflects the actual appearance of the 
particular bridge is its modeled on, 
the other side shows the truss style used in that particular construction.
Mr. Coughlin can explain the significance of each.